Composing

All tunes copyright Harry Bolick, please contact me if you are interested in using them or have questions or comments.

Double Talk

is a series of multivoiced compositions with titles collected from my research into Euphemisims, Double talk, Idiom, and Obfuscation. Isn't it a great language!
Each piece is conceived as a melody and it's counterpoint companion, ie, two voices. Then it gets a bit more complicated. I'll be posting sketches of these pieces on this page as I work them out. The audio files are midi voices renedered from my music notation program and subject to the program and my limitiations.

Too Poor to Window Shop Written for an ensemble of Mandolin, Guitar, Banjo, Flute, Piccolo,Cello and Bass

Been Around the Block - The title is slang for being experienced. Written for an ensemble of Two Trumpets, Trombone, Tuba

Bite the Dust - The title isa a euphemism for death. Written for an ensemble of English Horn, Trumpet, Trombone, Piano and Bass.

No Light in His Attic - The title is slang for low intelligence. Written for an ensemble of Trumpet, Trombone, French Horn, Oboe and Tuba.

Act of Darkness - the title is one of Shakespear's euphemisms for the sexual act. Written for an ensemble of Flute, Clarinet, Cello, Bass.

At Peace with the Floor - the title is one of Shakespeare's euphemisms for the sexual act. Written for an ensemble of Flute, Oboe, Harp, Marimba, Vibraphone, Bass.

Crosses and Losses - the title is name for a quilting pattern. Written for an ensemble of Piano, Harp, Guitar, Bass.

Eating Dandelions by the Root - the title is French euphemism for being buried, ie, death. Written for an ensemble of Flute, Harp, Mandolin, Bass.

Eve with the Lid On - the title is late 1800s slang for apple pie. Written for an ensemble of Harp, Trombone, Flute, Bass.

Fuss and Feathers - the title is late 1800s slang for fancy dressing for a night out. Written for an ensemble of Harp, Flute, Guitar, Bass.

Left a Vacant Chair - the title is French euphemism for death. Written for an ensemble of Flute, Oboe, Harp, Bass.

Might as Well, Can’t Dance - the title is slang for "why not?". Written for an ensemble of Clarinet, Baritone Sax, Trumpet, Trombone, Bass.

One Foot on the Floor - the title is an early American courting custom where the suitor might sit on the lady's bed but one foot must remain on the floor. Written for an ensemble of Harp, Marimba, Steel Guitar, Tuba, Bass.

Snowing Down South - the title is way of discreetly telling a lady that her slip is showing. Written for an ensemble of Cello, Tenor Sax, Baritone Sax, Harp, Marimba and Bass.

Tell it Slant - the title is slang for the opposite of "telling it straight". Written for an ensemble of Harp, Marimba, Banjo, Oboe and Bass.

Soup and Fish - the title is slang, circa 1905, for full evening dress. Written for an ensemble of Piano, French Horn, Trombone and Bass

Open Your Cupboard To Me - The title is a line from a folk song from Mississippi in which the starving Confederate soldier returns home. This piece is composed of 4 parts each 8 measures in length, each a cournterpoint/harmony for the other parts. Since the form is base on a 2 measure repeating chord change, the latter part of this piece is played as a round. Written for an ensemble of Piano, Guitar, Mandolin, Trombone and Bass

Elk River Blues- My arrangement of Ernie Carpenter’s lament for his poisoned river. Written for an ensemble of Trumpet, Trombone, French Horn, Oboe and Tuba.